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The Ultimate Guide to Breaking TallyVault Encryption in Tally ERP 9



How to Crack Tally ERP 9 Vault Password




Tally ERP 9 is a popular software that helps businesses manage their accounting, inventory, taxation, payroll, and other aspects of their operations. It is widely used by small and medium enterprises in India and other countries. However, like any other software, Tally ERP 9 also has some security features that protect the data of the users from unauthorized access.




How To Crack Tally Erp 9 Vault Password



One of these features is TallyVault, which is an enhanced security system that allows encryption of the company data. By setting a TallyVault password, the user can hide the company name and all the transaction details from anyone who does not know the password. This ensures privacy and confidentiality of the company data.


However, there might be some situations where someone might want to crack the TallyVault password. For example, a hacker might want to steal the company data for malicious purposes, or an employee might want to access the company data for personal gain, or a user might forget the password and lose access to the company data. Whatever the reason, cracking the TallyVault password is not an easy task, as it involves breaking a strong encryption algorithm.


In this article, we will explore some of the methods that can be used to crack the TallyVault password. We will cover three main methods: brute-force attack, dictionary attack, and social engineering. We will also discuss the tools that are needed for each method, and how to use them effectively. However, before we proceed, we must warn you that cracking passwords is illegal and unethical, unless you have permission from the owner of the data. Therefore, we advise you to use these methods only for educational purposes, and not for any malicious intent.


How to crack TallyVault password using brute-force attack




A brute-force attack is a method that involves trying all possible combinations of characters until the correct password is found. It is based on the assumption that any password can be cracked if enough time and resources are available. However, this method also has some limitations, such as:


  • It can take a very long time to crack a complex password, especially if it has a large length and uses different types of characters.



  • It can consume a lot of computing power and bandwidth, which can affect the performance of other applications and devices.



  • It can be detected and blocked by security systems that monitor login attempts and impose limits or restrictions.



To perform a brute-force attack on TallyVault password, we need two things: a tool that can generate and test different combinations of characters, and a target that can accept and verify login requests. For this purpose, we will use Hydra, which is a popular tool that can perform rapid brute-force attacks against more than 50 protocols, including SSH, FTP, HTTP, HTTPS, SMB, databases, and others. Hydra was developed by a hacker group called The Hacker's Choice in 2000 as a proof of concept tool that demonstrated how to perform attacks on network logon services.


To use Hydra to crack TallyVault password, we need to follow these steps:


  • Download and install Hydra from here.



  • Identify the IP address and port number of the target system that runs Tally ERP 9. You can find this information by opening Tally ERP 9 on the target system and checking the server details on the bottom right corner of the screen. For example, if the server details show "Tally ERP 9 Server: 192.168.1.100:9000", then the IP address is 192.168.1.100 and the port number is 9000.



  • Create a text file that contains all possible combinations of characters that you want to try as passwords. You can use a tool like Crunch or RSMangler to generate this file, or you can download a ready-made wordlist from here. The file should have one password per line, and the passwords should be in ascending order of length and complexity. For example, the file could look like this:



123 abc 1234 abcd 12345 abcde ...


  • Open a command prompt or terminal window and navigate to the folder where you have installed Hydra and saved the wordlist file.



  • Type the following command to start the brute-force attack:



hydra -l admin -P wordlist.txt -s 9000 -f 192.168.1.100 http-get /tallyvault


In this command, we are using the following options:


  • -l admin: This specifies the username that we want to use for login. In this case, we are assuming that the username is admin, which is the default username for TallyVault. If you know or guess a different username, you can use that instead.



  • -P wordlist.txt: This specifies the name of the file that contains the passwords that we want to try.



  • -s 9000: This specifies the port number of the target system that runs Tally ERP 9.



  • -f 192.168.1.100: This specifies the IP address of the target system that runs Tally ERP 9.



  • http-get /tallyvault: This specifies the protocol and the path that we want to use for login. In this case, we are using HTTP GET method and requesting the /tallyvault page, which is where TallyVault login is located.



Hydra will start sending login requests to the target system with different passwords from the wordlist file, and display the progress and results on the screen. If Hydra finds a valid password, it will stop the attack and show a message like this:


[DATA] attacking http-get://admin@192.168.1.100:9000/tallyvault [9000][http-get] host: 192.168.1.100 login: admin password: tally123 [STATUS] attack finished for 192.168.1.100 (waiting for children to complete tests) 1 of 1 target successfully completed, 1 valid password found Hydra (https://github.com/vanhauser-thc/thc-hydra) finished at 2023-06-12 02:35:28


This means that Hydra has cracked the TallyVault password, which is tally123 in this example.


How to crack TallyVault password using dictionary attack




A dictionary attack is a method that involves trying a list of common or likely passwords until the correct password is found. It is based on the assumption that many users choose passwords that are easy to remember or guess, such as words, names, dates, phrases, or patterns. However, this method also has some limitations, such as:


  • It can fail to crack a password that is not in the dictionary or wordlist.



  • It can be affected by variations in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, or encoding of the passwords.



  • It can be detected and blocked by security systems that monitor login attempts and impose limits or restrictions.



To perform a dictionary attack on TallyVault password, we need two things: a tool that can test different passwords from a wordlist, and a target that can accept and verify login requests. For this purpose, we will use John the Ripper, which is a popular tool that can perform fast and flexible password cracking against various types of hashes and encrypted files. John the Ripper was developed by Solar Designer in 1996 as an open source tool that improved upon existing password crackers at that time.


To use John the Ripper to crack TallyVault password, we need to follow these steps:


  • Download and install John the Ripper from here .



  • Identify the hash type and value of the TallyVault password. A hash is a one-way function that transforms a password into a fixed-length string of characters, which is stored in the system instead of the plain-text password. To crack the password, we need to reverse the hash function and find the original password that produces the same hash value. However, different systems use different hash algorithms and formats, so we need to know what type of hash we are dealing with. For TallyVault, the hash type is SHA-1, and the hash value is stored in a file called tallylic9.lic, which is located in the Tally ERP 9 installation folder. To find the hash value, we need to open the tallylic9.lic file with a text editor and look for a line that starts with . The hash value is the string of 40 hexadecimal characters that follows the tag. For example, if the line looks like this:



7c4a8d09ca3762af61e59520943dc26494f8941b


Then the hash value is 7c4a8d09ca3762af61e59520943dc26494f8941b.


  • Create a text file that contains the hash value and save it as tallyvault.hash. For example, the file could look like this:



7c4a8d09ca3762af61e59520943dc26494f8941b


  • Create or download a wordlist file that contains common or likely passwords that you want to try. You can use a tool like Crunch or RSMangler to generate this file, or you can download a ready-made wordlist from here. The file should have one password per line, and the passwords should be relevant to the target system or user. For example, the file could look like this:



tally admin password 123456 tally123 tallyerp9 companyname ...


  • Open a command prompt or terminal window and navigate to the folder where you have installed John the Ripper and saved the tallyvault.hash and wordlist files.



  • Type the following command to start the dictionary attack:



john --format=raw-sha1 --wordlist=wordlist.txt tallyvault.hash


In this command, we are using the following options:


  • --format=raw-sha1: This specifies the hash type that we are cracking. In this case, we are using raw SHA-1 hashes, which is what TallyVault uses.



  • --wordlist=wordlist.txt: This specifies the name of the file that contains the passwords that we want to try.



  • tallyvault.hash: This specifies the name of the file that contains the hash value that we want to crack.



John the Ripper will start testing different passwords from the wordlist file against the hash value, and display the progress and results on the screen. If John the Ripper finds a valid password, it will show a message like this:


tally123 (?) 1 password hash cracked, 0 left


This means that John the Ripper has cracked the TallyVault password, which is tally123 in this example.


How to crack TallyVault password using social engineering




Social engineering is a method that involves manipulating or deceiving people into revealing their passwords or other sensitive information. It is based on the assumption that humans are often the weakest link in security systems, and can be exploited by various psychological techniques. However, this method also has some limitations, such as:


  • It can require a lot of research, preparation, and creativity to craft convincing scenarios and messages.



  • It can depend on the cooperation and trust of the target person, which can vary depending on their personality, mood, and awareness.



  • It can be risky and illegal, as it can involve impersonation, fraud, or harassment.



To perform social engineering on TallyVault password, we need two things: a technique that can persuade or trick the target person into revealing their password, and a channel that can communicate with them. For this purpose, we will use three common techniques: phishing, baiting, and guessing. We will also discuss some possible channels that can be used for each technique. Phishing




Phishing is a technique that involves sending fake or spoofed emails or messages that appear to come from a legitimate or trusted source, such as Tally ERP 9 support, and asking the target person to provide their password or other information, or to click on a link or attachment that leads to a malicious website or file. The goal of phishing is to trick the target person into believing that the email or message is genuine and urgent, and that they need to comply with the request or offer.


To use phishing to crack TallyVault password, we need to follow these steps:


  • Create a fake email or message that mimics the style and tone of Tally ERP 9 support, and includes a convincing subject line and body text. For example, the email or message could look like this:



From: Tally ERP 9 Support


To: target@company.com Subject: Important: Update your TallyVault password Dear Tally ERP 9 user, We are writing to inform you that we have detected a security breach in our system that may have compromised your TallyVault password. To protect your data and prevent unauthorized access, we urge you to update your password as soon as possible. To update your password, please click on the link below and follow the instructions: http://tallyvault-update.com Please note that this link will expire in 24 hours, so do not delay. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at support@tallyerp9.com. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. Tally ERP 9 Support Team


  • Create a fake website or file that looks like the official Tally ERP 9 website or application, and asks the target person to enter their current and new TallyVault password. For example, the website or file could look like this:



TallyVault Password Update


body font-family: Arial, sans-serif; background-color: white; h1 color: green; text-align: center; form margin: 0 auto; width: 300px; label display: block; margin-bottom: 10px; input display: block; width: 100%; padding: 5px; border: 1px solid gray; button display: block; width: 100%; padding: 10px; background-color: green; color: white; border: none;


TallyVault Password Update




Please enter your current and new TallyVault password below.


Current Password:


New Password:


Update Password



  • Send the fake email or message to the target person, using a spoofed email address or phone number that looks like the official Tally ERP 9 support. For example, you can use a tool like Emkei's Fake Mailer or Spoofbox to send the fake email, or a tool like TextMagic or Twilio to send the fake message.



  • Wait for the target person to click on the link or open the attachment, and enter their current and new TallyVault password on the fake website or file. The fake website or file should capture and store the passwords that the target person enters, and display a confirmation or error message. For example, the fake website or file could show a message like this:



Thank you for updating your TallyVault password. Your data is now secure. Please close this window and restart your Tally ERP 9 application.


  • Access the fake website or file and retrieve the passwords that the target person entered. You can use a tool like FileZilla or WinSCP to access the fake website, or a tool like Process Explorer or Resource Hacker to access the fake file. You should be able to find the passwords in a text file or a resource file.



  • Use the current password that the target person entered to log in to TallyVault and access their company data. You can also use the new password that they entered, but it might not work if they realize that they have been phished and change their password again.



Baiting




Baiting is a technique that involves offering something of value or interest to the target person, such as a free download, a gift card, a survey, or a job opportunity, and asking them to provide their password or other information, or to click on a link or attachment that leads to a malicious website or file. The goal of baiting is to entice the target person into taking action based on their curiosity, greed, or need.


To use baiting to crack TallyVault password, we need to follow these steps:


  • Create a fake offer or incentive that appeals to the target person, and relates to their profession, industry, or interests. For example, you can create a fake email or message that offers a free ebook, a discount coupon, a webinar invitation, or a job interview.



  • Create a fake website or file that looks like the official source of the offer or incentive, and asks the target person to enter their TallyVault password or other information, or to click on a link or attachment that leads to a malicious website or file. For example, you can create a fake website or file that looks like an online bookstore, a shopping site, a webinar platform, or a job portal.



  • Send the fake email or message to the target person, using a spoofed email address or phone number that looks like the official source of the offer or incentive. For example, you can use a tool like Emkei's Fake Mailer or Spoofbox to send the fake email, or a tool like TextMagic or Twilio to send the fake message.



  • Wait for the target person to click on the link or open the attachment, and enter their TallyVault password or other information on the fake website or file. The fake website or file should capture and store the passwords or information that the target person enters, and display a confirmation or error message. For example, the fake website or file could show a message like this:



Thank you for downloading our free ebook on Tally ERP 9 tips and tricks. Your download will start shortly. Please enter your TallyVault password to verify your identity and access your ebook.


  • Access the fake website or file and retrieve the passwords or information that the target person entered. You can use a tool like FileZilla or WinSCP to access the fake website, or a tool like Process Explorer or Resource Hacker to access the fake file. You should be able to find the passwords or information in a text file or a resource file.



  • Use the password that the target person entered to log in to TallyVault and access their company data.



Guessing




Guessing is a technique that involves trying to figure out the password based on the personal or professional information of the target person, such as their name, date of birth, phone number, email address, company name, hobbies, interests, or favorite things. It is based on the assumption that many users choose passwords that are related to themselves or their surroundings, and that can be easily remembered or guessed. However, this method also has some limitations, such as:


  • It can require a lot of research, analysis, and intuition to find and use relevant information about the target person.



  • It can be affected by variations in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, or encoding of the passwords.



  • It can be detected and blocked by security systems that monitor login attempts and impose limits or restrictions.



To use guessing to crack TallyVault password, we need to follow these steps:


Gather as much information as possible about the target person, such as their name, date of birth, phone number, email address, company name, hobbies, interests, favorite things, social media profiles, online activities, etc. You can use various sources of information, such as public records, online databases, search engi


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